Marlene Dietrich photographed by John Engstead, 1953

Marlene Dietrich photographed by John Engstead, 1953

tagged → #maureen o'hara
barbarastanwyck:

Olivia de Havilland getting final touch ups on the set of Gone With the Wind, 1939

barbarastanwyck:

Olivia de Havilland getting final touch ups on the set of Gone With the Wind, 1939

gnarly:

*starts typing text post*

*realizes nobody cares*

*stops typing text post*

jojobaker69:

josephine baker 1931

jojobaker69:

josephine baker 1931

tagged → #josephine baker

Cary Grant on the set of Crisis (1950)

Cary Grant on the set of Crisis (1950)

tagged → #ew #cary grant

teamrocketing:

*knocks you out with a calculator* bet you weren’t counting on that

tagged → #fuck

leviathans-in-the-tardis:

you don’t realise how much tumblr has changed your view on things until you spend time with friends who don’t have tumblr and they say something and you’re just like

oh

Why people seems not wanting to talk to me on tumblr? I’M VERY NICE PEOPLE DONUT BE SCARE BC I DONT BITE VERY HARD

tagged → #preach
avasgal:

"What I liked about Ava was that we had so much in common it was like we were two young people from the same hometown. We both were products of middle-class, small American towns where everybody knew everybody, and it was on that basis that we struck up an immediate friendship. Ava was also outspoken, and there was something refreshing about that because sometimes she’d be outspoken when other people would be afraid to. That to me shows a strength of character and the kind of grass-roots, middle-American honesty she has. Sometimes I’ve thought that except for that out-of-the-world beauty—that sensational bone structure, those eyes, and that figure—she was typical of dozens of girls I knew in high school and college. But that beauty shaped and changed her, and she became an object of pursuit, adulation, and attention such as few girls ever know." 
-Gregory Peck

avasgal:

"What I liked about Ava was that we had so much in common it was like we were two young people from the same hometown. We both were products of middle-class, small American towns where everybody knew everybody, and it was on that basis that we struck up an immediate friendship. Ava was also outspoken, and there was something refreshing about that because sometimes she’d be outspoken when other people would be afraid to. That to me shows a strength of character and the kind of grass-roots, middle-American honesty she has. Sometimes I’ve thought that except for that out-of-the-world beauty—that sensational bone structure, those eyes, and that figure—she was typical of dozens of girls I knew in high school and college. But that beauty shaped and changed her, and she became an object of pursuit, adulation, and attention such as few girls ever know."

-Gregory Peck